BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Oftentimes there is stigma that is associated with chronic pain. A chronic pain diagnosis is life-changing and can be difficult to understand. Because of this, the added stigma of a chronic pain diagnosis can make it much more difficult. Whether it is a lack of belief or judgements from others, this stigma can be harmful to those who experience chronic pain....

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Understanding chronic pain can be difficult, especially if you’ve never experienced it yourself. It can particularly difficult to adjust to family and friends experiencing chronic pain. You can often end up feeling helpless or sad that loved ones are unable to participate in things they once enjoyed. Having a strong support system is important for chronic pain patients, so here are a few tips for chronic pain friends and family to help adjust to and understand the diagnosis. Tips for chronic pain family and friends:   Listen. Chronic pain can be difficult to explain but listening to friends and family who experience it can help you better understand and empathize with them. Since chronic pain doesn’t affect everyone the same way, it’s important to understand how it specifically affects your loved one. Ask. Chronic pain patients may be afraid to ask for help due to fear of being a burden, the stigma of chronic pain or a number of other reasons. Simple tasks like grocery shopping and cleaning can become difficult with chronic pain symptoms. Asking your loved one if there are tasks you can help with is a good show of support and can help reduce symptom-increasing activities. Understand. While it can be difficult to understand the effects of chronic pain without experiencing it yourself, try to understand and empathize how chronic pain affects your loved one’s life. Stigma around chronic pain is common and many people may think pain is “all in a person’s head,” but understanding that chronic pain is a real diagnosis with real symptoms is essential for family and friends of chronic pain patients. Show up. Whether it’s showing up physically or just to talk, being there for your friend or family member with chronic pain is important. Having a good support system...

Happy new year! If you have goals and resolutions for 2019, then you might be wondering how to keep up your progress. For many of us, we start the new year with great intentions, but it can be difficult to stick to your resolutions. ...

Can meditation help with your chronic pain? Pain can be related to stress when we focus too much on the outside world. Many studies have been done recently, as physicians and mental health professionals turn toward the understanding that holistic health means healing the body and the mind. As a result, meditation practices have gained respect as a legitimate alternative chronic pain management treatment....

Stress affects everybody. However, for those with chronic pain, stress can be more common and more harmful. By learning to control stress and reduce the strain on the central nervous system, some patients experienced reduced chronic pain symptoms. ...

With the new year right around the corner, it’s the time when resolutions are made. New Year’s resolutions come in all shapes and sizes, but for chronic pain sufferers, there are a few resolutions that could help you reduce your pain. Focusing on yourself and your overall health, including your emotional and mental health, is important to reducing your pain symptoms....

During cold weather, joint and other chronic pain can worsen. Whether you have arthritis or inflammation problems, cold weather can worsen your symptoms. There could be many reasons for increased pain during winter months, and it’s important to find ways to reduce your chronic pain during cold weather. Here are a few tips that could help you reduce chronic pain during cold weather...

The “winter blues” is a common phrase for mood changes during colder months; however, those blues are really a disorder called Seasonal Affective Disorder. Those with chronic pain who may already be suffering from depression may be more likely to experience Seasonal Affective Disorder. ...

The holidays can be stressful. Between hosting family members, preparing holiday meals, cooking or even just grocery shopping during the holiday season, it’s easy to experience stress. Chronic pain can be worsened by stress, so it’s important to learn how to ease holiday stress. ...